What's Your Next Move? Growing Your Career in the Gig Economy

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In their new book Up is Not the Only Way: Rethinking Career Mobility, Beverly Kaye, Lindy Williams and Lynne Cowart point out that advancing your career doesn’t necessarily mean you have to climb the proverbial corporate ladder. That might be your journey, but it doesn’t have to be. It’s up to you.

“In place of a ladder of promotions,” they advise, “think of [your] career as a rich, flexible mix of experiences.” From this point of view, you could even embark on a fulfilling journey of growth and new opportunities without ever leaving your current job.

This isn’t just inspirational advice; in a world where fixed, linear career paths and stable, predictable job markets are a thing of the past, it’s both practical and realistic to think this way. Technology and the “gig economy” have also dramatically changed not only how work gets done but where you do it, who you might collaborate with and what you can feasibly do. You might have a more traditional job as well as a side gig. Or you might work a series of gigs, requiring more flexibility and personal control.

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Teach Your Employees How to Deal With Fear So They Can Get Ahead

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If you’re a leader or an HR professional, one of your jobs is to help others grow, whether through developing new skills or encouraging them to take the leap to new responsibilities. But just because you’re confident the person’s ready for the next step, it doesn’t mean the employee is. Even an employee who’s been asking for the promotion or appealing to get involved with high-profile projects can suddenly get cold feet when that dream turns into a reality.

It’s not all that surprising when you think about it, though. Change, even welcome change, can be scary. You’re entering the unknown, the expectations are high and you have a lot to learn. And we know that learning is uncomfortable. So, when you’re working with someone who seems reluctant to take a big step, or maybe they’re struggling in a new role, the culprit might be something very simple and primal: fear.

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Gain Clarity About Your Future With the One Sheet Technique

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My dad was an accomplished guy. For years before he started his own assessment and consulting company, he directed management education at General Electric. In his mission to apply brain dominance theory to learning, he created a body of work that included two books and the Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI®). He also actively pursued his avocations—landscape painting and singing. In college, he majored in physics and music, and he once performed in an opera at Carnegie Hall.

One day I knocked on the door of my dad’s office and said, “Okay, level with me. How did you get all this done? What’s the real scoop?”

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Will Work for Meaning: Engaging and Retaining Talent

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By most accounts, the Millennial generation is the most exhaustively studied and researched generation of all time. Organizations obsess and scrutinize the data to see what the implications are for business and the future of the workforce. What do Millennials want? What motivates them? How can we keep them—and keep them engaged?

Making sweeping, generalized statements about any large group of people is an easy trap to fall into, and that’s often the case with the way statistics about Millennial turnover and retention rates are interpreted. According to Deloitte’s Millennial Survey 2016, 44% are willing to leave their current employer for a new organization or to do something different within the next two years. Two in three expect to leave by 2020.

The oversimplified, boiled-down conclusion: This is a group of perennial job-hoppers who don’t have any real allegiance to their companies. But dig a little deeper, and you might find that the bigger story here is that many companies aren’t giving Millennials much reason to stay. And the issue may not be so neatly tied to a single generation.

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The Best Employee Training for Recent Grads? Creating Lifelong Learners

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Hiring recent grads: Must be a strong writer, public speaker, critical thinker and complex problem solver. Well-developed analytical, technical, interpersonal and communication skills required. Looking for a team player who also possesses effective leadership qualities. Focused attention to detail and solid data orientation a must.

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